7 Facts About Yosemite Ski and Snowboard Area (Badger Pass) and Why You Should Visit

The Yosemite Ski and Snowboard Area, previously known as Badger Pass Ski Resort is located 17.6 miles (about 30 min. drive one way) from Wawona inside Yosemite National Park. Conditions permitting, it is open from mid-December through mid-March, and brings many visitors to visit and test out its slopes each year. With an elevation difference of 7,200-8,000 feet, and a vertical drop of 800 ft, it offers 88 acres of groomed ski area, 10 ski runs, and five chairlifts. It’s ideal for all-levels of snowboarding, downhill and cross country skiing, tubing, and much more. Plus, it’s affordable and family-friendly. Here are some other fun facts about this Yosemite hot (err cold) spot!

 

     1. It’s the OLDEST “original” ski resort in the state of California!

 

It was established in 1933 as Badger Pass Ski Resort, as a result of increased interest in winter sports in the 1920’s.

 

  1. It’s the only National Park to put in a bid to host the winter Olympics and it is home to the west’s first ski tow/lift

 

Yosemite put in a bid for the 1932 Winter Olympics, but unfortunately lost to Lake Placid. The park, however, still hosted ice skating tryouts for those same games. Neat stuff, right?

In 1936, Yosemite lit the way for not having to schlep your ski equipment up the slopes. It was called the “Upski,” and it moved up and down on a cable, and could carry six skiers at a time. Thankfully, they’ve come a long way since, now offering five (1 handle tow, 3 double-chair and 1 triple chair) chairlifts.

 

  1. It’s the perfect place to learn how to ski or snowboard, or simply practice your skills!

 

There are 10 runs total for beginner (35%), intermediate (50%) and advanced levels (15%). Whether you are planning to learn, or improve your ski or snowboarding game, you’ll be in good hands as many of the professional instructors are also members of the Professional Ski Instructors of America.  

 

  1. It has a great sundeck for overlooking the Sierras

 

You can sit here and people watch, bask in the sun, take selfies, and if you’re a parent, you can watch your children learn the ropes.

 

  1. You can cross-country ski to Glacier Point

 

Glacier Point may be closed to cars for the season, but not to skiers! Of the more than 90-mile network of ski trails, you can complete the 21-mile round trip trek to Glacier Point.

 

  1. It is one of only three National Parks that has a ski lift

 

Yosemite has it all. The only other two national parks with ski lifts are Cuyahoga Valley National Park in Ohio and Olympic National Park in Washington.

 

      7. There are activities for more than just skiing, and snowboarding and sometimes you can even access at night!

 

There is snow tubing for the entire family, or maybe you would rather hang out at the deck or in the cafeteria. There are also NPS snowshoe guided tours. If you can’t get enough of it during the day, there are overnight skiing excursions to the Yosemite backcountry and Glacier Point.

 

Looking for a cabin near the slopes?

 

Check out our online winter special or call us for something extra (pssst. FREE Park Pass and a 3rd Night Free deal details can be seen here)

Our Redwoods In Yosemite cabins and spacious vacation homes are located in Wawona, 6 miles from the Southern entrance of Yosemite and from the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias parking area. Relaxing and private, our fully equipped vacation homes border the wild and scenic South Fork of The Merced River, the Wawona swinging bridge and Chilnualna Falls (the second highest vertical drop waterfall cascade in Yosemite)! Our Event Center includes full use of a Fireside Room and adjacent deck with fireplace, an audio & visual equipment, a catering kitchen and able to accommodate groups and events comfortably up to 120 people. Many of our cabins are pet-friendly too, some feature spa tubs, and all have private decks with BBQ’s and upgraded linens for that, “Home Away from Home” experience.

Relax, explore, and escape in Yosemite!

 

text credit: Christina P. Kantzavelos